New book – emotional missionaries

The emotional experience of Victorian women missionaries was something that I tried to research while doing my PhD. But, as with much study of historical emotions, the experience itself was difficult – if not impossible – to examine. All I could access were the written accounts of emotional experience, which were often written to fit an accepted formula or to evoke emotions in a projected audience. I don’t disregard such written accounts of emotional experience completely – just because a feeling is described in a formulaic manner, doesn’t make it necessarily inauthentic – but I did change my focus slightly to think more about how the emotions of my missionaries were textually expressed and how such emotional texts functioned within the Christian community which read them. This approach also made more sense for a literature specialist in an English department!

It turns out, it’s also an approach that makes sense to certain historians studying emotions too, as when I read the publicity material for a new book on missionaries and emotions it struck me that the essays aren’t focusing on how emotions were felt by missionaries, but how they were ‘conceptualised and practised’

Missionary emotions screen shot.

I was thrilled to be asked to contribute an essay for this book, based on my PhD research. The process of revising, post-PhD, what was initially a seminar paper written pre-PhD, has been an interesting one, which I’ll write about in another post. For now, though, I just wanted to share how pleased I am that this fascinating project, long in discussion, is finally coming to fruition. We don’t yet have a publication date, but the book’s appearance on Palgrave’s website is pretty exciting. Exciting to me, personally, because I think it will probably be my first proper print publication. But exciting more generally, because I think its editors, Claire McLisky, Daniel Midena, and Karen Vallgårda, have really made the case for the importance of studying emotion in missionary history.

For more information about the book, see Palgrave’s website.

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